About SPEC 17

The 3rd IEEE Southern Power Electronics Conference, SPEC 2017, offers an ideal opportunity for researchers, engineers, academics and students from all over the world to bring the latest technological advances and applications in Power Electronics to the Southern Hemisphere, as well as to network and promote the discipline.

Cutting-edge researchers in this field will present keynote speeches during a four-day program that also features tutorials and technical sessions on theory, analysis, design, testing and advances within the field of power electronics. The conference venue, Hotel Patagónico, is situated in the vibrant city of Puerto Varas, one of Chile’s most touristic cities.

Conference delegates can anticipate a beautiful “clean & green” landscape with amazing views of the surrounding lakes and volcanoes along with a lively social program that includes a diverse array of activities. All the papers presented at the conference will be included in the IEEEXplore Digital Library.

Speaker
Keynote speakers
  • Frede Blaabjerg University of Aalborg, Denmark
    Frede Blaabjerg University of Aalborg, Denmark
    Design for reliability in power electronic systems

    In recent years, the automotive and aerospace industries have brought stringent reliability constraints on power electronic converters because of safety requirements. Today customers of many power electronic products expect up to 20 years of lifetime and they also want to have a “failure free period” and all with focus on the financials. The renewable energy sectors are also following the same trend, and more and more efforts are being devoted to improving power electronic converters to account for reliability with cost-effective and sustainable solutions. This presentation will introduce the recent progress in the reliability aspect study of power electronic converters for power electronic applications with special focus on renewables. It will cover the following contents: the motivations for highly reliable electric energy conversion in renewable energy systems; the reliability requirements of typical renewable energy systems and its implication on the power electronic converters; failure mechanisms and lifetime models of key power electronic components (e.g., power semiconductor switches, capacitors, and fans); long-term mission profiles in Photovoltaic (PV) and wind power applications and the component level stress analysis; reliability analysis methods, tools, and improvement strategies of power electronic converters for renewable energy systems. A few case studies on PV and wind power based renewable energy systems will also be discussed.

    BIOGRAPHY

    Frede Blaabjerg (S’86–M’88–SM’97–F’03) was with ABB-Scandia, Randers, Denmark, from 1987 to 1988. From 1988 to 1992, he got the PhD degree in Electrical Engineering at Aalborg University in 1995. He became an Assistant Professor in 1992, an Associate Professor in 1996, and a Full Professor of power electronics and drives in 1998. From 2017 he became a Villum Investigator.

    His current research interests include power electronics and its applications such as in wind turbines, PV systems, reliability, harmonics and adjustable speed drives. He has published more than 450 journal papers in the fields of power electronics and its applications. He is the co-author of two monographs and editor of 6 books in power electronics and its applications.

    He has received 18 IEEE Prize Paper Awards, the IEEE PELS Distinguished Service Award in 2009, the EPE-PEMC Council Award in 2010, the IEEE William E. Newell Power Electronics Award 2014 and the Villum Kann Rasmussen Research Award 2014. He was the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS from 2006 to 2012. He has been Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Power Electronics Society from 2005 to 2007 and for the IEEE Industry Applications Society from 2010 to 2011 as well as 2017 to 2018.

    He is nominated in 2014, 2015 and 2016 by Thomson Reuters to be between the most 250 cited researchers in Engineering in the world. In 2017 he became Honoris Causa at University Politehnica Timisoara (UPT), Romania.

  • Patrick Wheeler University of Nottingham, U.K
    Patrick Wheeler University of Nottingham, U.K
    Why the More and All Electric Aircraft Needs Power Electronics

    There has recently been a major change in the design of aircraft. Electrical systems are being used in applications which have traditionally been powered by hydraulic or pneumatic sources. The Boeing 787 and the Airbus A380 both have significantly larger electrical systems than any previous aircraft.  The most important enabling technology for the More Electric Aircraft is been power electronics. Without power conversion none of the benefits of this technology would be possible. However, aerospace applications present some challenging conditions for power electronics and there are still a number of areas where improvements must be made in terms of the weight, volume, cost and reliability of systems. This presentation will introduce the More Electric Aircraft concept and investigate the potential benefits of the technology before considering the challenges our community will have to meet to make the concept of Electric Propulsion of large aircraft possible.  The talk will be illustrated with a selection of case studies of systems that have been developed.

    BIOGRAPHY

    Prof Pat Wheeler received his BEng [Hons] degree in 1990 from the University of Bristol, UK.  He received his PhD degree in Electrical Engineering for his work on Matrix Converters from the University of Bristol, UK in 1994.  In 1993 he moved to the University of Nottingham and worked as a research assistant in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.  In 1996 he became a Lecturer in the Power Electronics, Machines and Control Group at the University of Nottingham, UK.  Since January 2008 he has been a Full Professor in the same research group.  He is currently Head of the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering at the University of Nottingham.  He is an IEEE PELs ‘Member at Large’ and an IEEE PELs Distinguished Lecturer.  He has published 400 academic publications in leading international conferences and journals.

  • Ralph Kennel Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Germany
    Ralph Kennel Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Germany
    Encoders for Simultaneous Sensing of Position and Speed - a Bottleneck in Electrical Drives with Digital Control

    Speed and position encoders are essential components in electrical drives. High resolution encoders are necessary to obtain acceptable speed control behaviour. Therefore, optical encoders are mainly used in servo drives as position (and speed) feedback. Optical encoders, however, do not provide a robustness comparable to electrical motors – hard environmental influences like mechanical shock and/or vibrations often damage the optical disc inside the encoder. Using resolvers provides better mechanical robustness – their resolution, however, is not sufficient for good speed control behaviour.

     

    Speed and position sensing in servo drives is an issue that is still not completely understood. Expressions like accuracy and resolution still get mixed up when engineers talk about encoders. These words, however, do describe different characteristics and should not be confused. The introduction of digital control has made this issue much more important for servo drive applications than before. The lecture is going to present some general explanations of speed and motion sensing as well as different encoder technologies available today and their characteristics, particularly with respect to digitally controlled servo drives.

     

    A message surprising most engineers is, that neither high resolution resolvers nor high resolution optical encoders do provide features that could make them competitive to analogue precision tacho generators. As a result, the behaviour of digital speed control can still not be as good as of former analogue speed control. The question why servo drives with digital speed control in fact are successful – nobody does worry about any impact of optical encoders, because the performance of servo drives with digital control has indeed improved in comparison to former drives with analogue control – will be responded in the plenary speech as well. The technical reasons for that will be explained and hereby the lecture contributes to better understanding of speed and position encoders, which still are the technical bottle neck for further improvements in digital drive control

    BIOGRAPHY

    Ralph M. Kennel was born in 1955 at Kaiserslautern (Germany). In 1979 he got his diploma degree and in 1984 his Dr.-Ing. (Ph.D.) degree from the University of Kaiserslautern.

    From 1983 to 1999 he worked on several positions with Robert BOSCH GmbH (Germany). Until 1997 he was responsible for the development of servo drives. Dr. Kennel was one of the main supporters of VECON and SERCOS interface, two multi-company development projects for a microcontroller and a digital interface especially dedicated to servo drives. Furthermore, he took actively part in the definition and release of new standards with respect to CE marking for servo drives.

    Between 1997 and 1999 Dr. Kennel was responsible for “Advanced and Product Development of Fractional Horsepower Motors” in automotive applications. His main activity was preparing the introduction of brushless drive concepts to the automotive market.

    From 1994 to 1999 Dr. Kennel was appointed Visiting Professor at the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne (England, UK). From 1999 – 2008 he was Professor for Electrical Machines and Drives at Wuppertal University (Germany). Since 2008 he is Professor for Electrical Drive systems and Power Electronics at Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany). His main interests today are: Sensorless control of AC drives, predictive control of power electronics and Hardware-in-the-Loop systems.

    Dr. Kennel is a Senior Member of IEEE, a Fellow of IET (former IEE) and a Chartered Engineer in the UK. Within IEEE he is Treasurer of the Germany Section as well as Distinguished Lecturer of the Power Electronics Society (IEEE-PELS).

    Dr. Kennel has received in 2013 the Harry Owen Distinguished Service Award from IEEE-PELS as well as the EPE Association Distinguished Service Award in 2015.

    Dr. Kennel was appointed “Extraordinary Professor” by the University of Stellenbosch (South Africa) from 2016 to 2019 and as “Visiting Professor” at the Haixi Institute by the Chinese Academy of Sciences from 2016 to 2021. There he was appointed as “Jiaxi Lu Overseas Guest Professor” in 2017.

  • Qing-Chang Zhong Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, USA.
    Qing-Chang Zhong Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, USA.
    Next-Generation Smart Grids: Power Electronics-Enabled Autonomous Power Systems

    Power systems are going through a paradigm change. The centralized large facilities are being replaced by millions of widely dispersed relatively small renewable or alternative power plants, plug-in EVs, and energy storage units. Moreover, the majority of loads are expected to actively take part in the grid regulation in the same way as suppliers do. This paradigm change is comparable to the great historical event of personal computers replacing mainframes in the technology domain or republics replacing monarchies in the political domain. In this lecture, the system architecture, together with a technical route, to enable this paradigm change will be presented. It will be shown that the synchronization mechanism of conventional synchronous machines, which has underpinned the power systems for over 100 years, will continue playing its fundamental role in power systems. It will empower all power electronics-interfaced suppliers and loads to behave like virtual synchronous machines so that they can take part in the regulation of system frequency and voltage, in the same way as conventional synchronous machines do. This will also release the communication infrastructure from low-level control and open up the prospect of achieving autonomous operation for power systems.

    BIOGRAPHY

    Dr. Qing-Chang Zhong holds the Max McGraw Endowed Chair Professor in Energy and Power Engineering at Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, USA. He obtained a PhD degree in 2000 from Shanghai Jiao-Tong University and another PhD degree in 2004 from Imperial College London. Having been recognized as a Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Control Systems Society, the IEEE Power Electronics Society and the IEEE Power and Energy Society, he is a world-leading multidisciplinary expert in control, power electronics and power systems. Before joining Illinois Institute of Technology, he was the Chair Professor in Control and Systems Engineering at The University of Sheffield, UK, where he built up a $5M+ research lab dedicated to the control of energy and power systems and attracted the support of Rolls-Royce, National Instruments, Texas Instruments, Siemens, ALSTOM, Turbo Power Systems, Chroma, Yokagawa, OPAL RT and other organizations. He (co-) authored three research monographs, including Control of Power Inverters in Renewable Energy and Smart Grid Integration (Wiley-IEEE Press, 2013). His fourth book on the architecture and technical routes of next-generation smart grids based on the synchronization mechanism of synchronous machines will be published by Wiley-IEEE in 2017. He is an Associate Editor for leading journals in control and power electronics, including IEEE Trans. on Power Electronics, IEEE Trans. on Industrial Electronics, IEEE Trans. on Automatic Control, and IEEE Trans. on Control Systems Technology. His current research focuses on advanced control theory, power electronics, and the seamless integration of both to address fundamental challenges in energy and power systems.

  • Sudip Mazumder University of Illinois, Chicago, USA
    Sudip Mazumder University of Illinois, Chicago, USA
    Nonlinear analysis of power-electronics systems and networks

    Optimal compromise between stability margin and performance of power-electronics systems is an ongoing challenge. It has now attained greater significance due to emerging applications encompassing but not limited to ac/dc microgrids (where multi-scale harmonic interactions and source intermittencies are redefining the need for modeling and stability), electric aircraft and ship power distribution systems (where plurality of loads that coupled over a non-stiff network and increasingly exhibit pulsating, nonlinear, and impulsive dynamics), multi-input-multi-output wireless power networks that are subjected to multi-channel variations, and applications of distributed power systems in telecommunication, data centers, point-of-load converters. In this presentation, we present a generalized approach, using switching and hybrid models, to investigate the global stability of standalone, integrated, and networked power-electronics systems, based on the research advancements made during the last two decades. Unlike conventional analyses techniques using averaged models, whose predictions are typically limited to averaged dynamics (under periodic switching conditions), the analyses techniques discussed in this presentation account for the switching dynamics of the power-electronics systems under saturated, quasi-saturated, and unsaturated (periodic-switching) operating conditions. To describe techniques for global stability analyses of power-electronics systems, the presentation is divided into two key focus areas, namely (a) analytical techniques based on composite Lyapunov functions to predict transient stability of a converter/converter network and its reachability (i.e., convergence of error/state trajectories from any arbitrary initial condition to equilibrium), and (b) steady-state stability predictions using bifurcation-analysis and other advanced nonlinear methodologies. Subsequently, an assessment will be made regarding the predictions of these new nonlinear techniques as compared to those predicted by conventional average-modeling-based methodologies. Further, we describe how these nonlinear-analyses techniques can lead to the development of advanced hybrid and optimal controllers, which yield better dynamic performances while ensuring large-scale stability of the power-electronics systems.

    BIOGRAPHY

    Sudip K. Mazumder received his Ph.D. degree from Virginia Tech in 2001. He is a Professor at the University of Illinois, Chicago and is the President of NextWatt LLC. He has over 24 years of professional experience and has held R&D and design positions in leading industrial organizations and has served as a Technical Consultant for several industries. He has published about 200 refereed papers and delivered 75 invited presentations. He is an IEEE Fellow (2016) and the recipient of University of Illinois, Chicago’s Inventor of the Year Award (2014), University of Illinois’ University Scholar Award (2013), ONR Young Investigator Award (2005), NSF CAREER Award (2003), and IEEE PELS Transaction Paper Award (2002). Currently, he serves as the Chair for IEEE PELS TC on Sustainable Energy Systems.

  • Alexander Gerfer Würth Elektronik eiSos group
    Alexander Gerfer Würth Elektronik eiSos group
    Magnetics in the digital world – the untold or forgotten facts

    Power Inductors and transformers are key components for high efficient power conversion circuits. However, young engineers often are faced with contradictions and uncertainties. Those result from:

    Missing Education – Without a solid foundation of basic knowledge there will be a spread of superficial knowledge or worst case ignorance.

    Alternative facts – there is a huge difference between reality and perception and suddenly all basic principles expire?

    Imprecise of manufacturers’ data – many manufacturers remain imprecise, but which parameters have to be more precise?

    Alexander Gerfer has more than 30 years of experience in the field of electronic components and circuit design. He is recognized for his knowledge and expertise about passive components and circuit design. In many design seminars and in the book ‘Trilogy of Magnetics’ (published by Würth Elektronik eiSos), the expertise and practical design tips and solutions are presented.

    He will give his view and suggestions how to make the life of an engineer a whole lot easier by focusing on targeted and quick solutions for optimized and high efficient circuits to speed up the process of designing.

    BIOGRAPHY

    Alexander Gerfer, born 1965, worked in the field of research and development for precision measuring instruments following his training as a radio and television technician. This was followed by a degree on electrical engineering at the Rheinische Fachhochschule of Cologne. While studying, Alexander Gerfer published numerous application circuits and construction guidelines from the field of consumer electronics. After his degree, he worked in electronic component distribution. He is author of numerous application notes for EMI and Inductive components. He held internationally workshops and seminars about basics and advanced design with EMI and Power Inductors. He is co-author of the “Trilogy of Magnetics” and other application handbooks published at Würth Elektronik eiSos group. After being head of R&D department since 1997, he is now CTO of the Würth Elektronik eiSos Group and responsible for the R&D, Quality and Product engineering and communications team within the eiSos group.

  • Josep Pou Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
    Josep Pou Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
    The Modular Multilevel Converter

    The modular multilevel converter (MMC) is an advanced converter topology that is changing the scenario of high-voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission systems. The MMC was first proposed in 2003 by Marquardt, and since then it has been an important focus of research for industry and universities. A three-phase MMC is integrated by six arms (two per phase-leg), each of them involving many cascaded submodules. The MMC offers an expandable and redundant configuration capable of generating a large number of voltage levels operating with high efficiency and reduced switching losses. This lecture will introduce the operation principles of the MMC and some recent research advances, including modulation techniques, capacitor voltage balancing and control techniques for the circulating currents.

    BIOGRAPHY

    Josep Pou received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the Technical University of Catalonia (UPC). He graduated first in the Bachelor graduating class, received the Master Degree with honours, and was awarded the outstanding Ph.D. Thesis Award at UPC.

    In 1990, he joined the faculty of UPC as an Assistant Professor, where he became an Associate Professor in 1993. From 2003 to 2007, he was Director of the Power Quality and Renewable Energy (QuPER) group, and from 2007 to 2013 he was Director of the Terrassa Industrial Electronics Group (TIEG), both research groups at UPC. From February 2013 to August 2016, he was a Full Professor with the University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney, Australia. In UNSW, he was technical research stream leader for the Solar Flagships Program Research Agenda, the result of AU$19-million investment from the Commonwealth Government of Australia in world class laboratories developed to study solar power conversion and its impact on the grid. He is currently an Associate Professor with the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, where he is Program Director of Power Electronics at the Energy Research Institute at NTU (ERI@N) and co-Director of the Electrical Power Systems Integration Lab at NTU (EPSIL@N), the electrical Rolls-Royce Corporate lab on NTU campus.

    He spent two sabbatical years (2001 and 2005) as a Visiting Professor at the Center for Power Electronics Systems, Virginia Tech, USA, and one year (2012) at the Australian Energy Research Institute (AERI), UNSW, Sydney. Since 2006, he has collaborated with Tecnalia Research & Innovation as a research consultant. He has authored over 230 published technical papers, is a co-inventor of 7 patents, and has been involved in several industrial projects and educational programs in the fields of power electronics and systems. He has authored one chapter of the book “Control Circuits in Power Electronics: Practical Issues in Design and Implementation,” (Ed. IET). He has received 7 scholarship and fellowship awards, including the prestigious Endeavour Research Fellowship Award, sponsored by the Australian Government.

    He is IEEE Fellow, and Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics and the IEEE Journal of Emerging and Selected Topics in Power Electronics. He was Invited Editor of the Special Section on Hybrid Multilevel Converters for the IET Power Electronics and Modular Multilevel Converters for the IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics.

Tutorial speakers
  • Lee Empringham The University of Nottingham, U.K.
    Lee Empringham The University of Nottingham, U.K.
    Power module packaging for WBG semiconductor devices, the future, reliability and failure modes for renewable energy applications

    Power Electronics is seen as an enabling technology for the creation of a low carbon global economy.  Power converters are necessary where there is the need to transform electrical energy from one form to another and are used in a very wide range of applications from the smallest smart-phone to the largest HVDC distribution systems.  The reliability of these systems is key to the growth of power electronics in emerging markets as the desire for longer lifetime and reduced costs are a significant driving force in present day developments. This tutorial will discuss the reliability issues of state of the art power electronic components including, power modules, power device interconnects, substrate interconnect, film capacitors to name but a few.  An understanding of the wear-out mechanisms for power electronic components and the development of life-time models will be discussed together with the prediction of future life at the design stage.  Practical methods to measure and analyse wear mechanism together with inducing failures in power components to validate models will be discussed along with practical examples. A significant emphasis will be placed of the future of power module design with respect to the use of wide band-gap semiconductor devices (SiC, GAN).

    BIOGRAPHY

    Lee Empringham (M’10) received the B.Eng. (Hons.) degree in electrical and electronic engineering and the Ph.D. degree from The University of Nottingham, Nottingham, U.K., in 1996 and 2000, respectively. Since then, he has been with the Power Electronics, Machines and Control Group as a Research Fellow to support different ongoing matrix converter projects and has been recently appointed to the position of Principal Research Fellow. His research interests include direct ac–ac power conversion, variable-speed ac motor drives using different circuit topologies, and more electric/electric aircraft applications. He is a Member of The Institution of Engineering and Technology, U.K.

  • Ralph Kennel Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Germany
    Ralph Kennel Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Germany
    Predictive Control in Power Electronics

    Up to now the control of electrical power using power converters has been based on the principle of mean value, using pulse width modulation with linear controllers in a cascaded structure.

    Recent research works have demonstrated that it is possible to use Predictive Control to control electrical energy with the use of power converters, without using modulators and linear controllers. This is a new approach that will have a strong impact on control in power electronics in coming decades.

    The main advantages of predictive control are:

    • Concepts are very intuitive and easy to understand.
    • It can be applied to a great variety of systems.
    • The multivariable case can be easily considered.
    • Dead times can be compensated.
    • Easy inclusion of non-linearities in the model.
    • Simple treatment of constraints.
    • The resulting controller is easy to implement.
    • This methodology is open to include modifications and extensions depending on specific applications.
    • The participants of this tutorial will learn:
    • The basic concepts and ideas.
    • Different types of predictive controllers.
    • Detailed examples of predictive controllers.
    • Several applications in different converter topologies.

     

    BIOGRAPHY

    Ralph M. Kennel was born in 1955 at Kaiserslautern (Germany). In 1979 he got his diploma degree and in 1984 his Dr.-Ing. (Ph.D.) degree from the University of Kaiserslautern.

    From 1983 to 1999 he worked on several positions with Robert BOSCH GmbH (Germany). Until 1997 he was responsible for the development of servo drives. Dr. Kennel was one of the main supporters of VECON and SERCOS interface, two multi-company development projects for a microcontroller and a digital interface especially dedicated to servo drives. Furthermore, he took actively part in the definition and release of new standards with respect to CE marking for servo drives.

    Between 1997 and 1999 Dr. Kennel was responsible for “Advanced and Product Development of Fractional Horsepower Motors” in automotive applications. His main activity was preparing the introduction of brushless drive concepts to the automotive market.

    From 1994 to 1999 Dr. Kennel was appointed Visiting Professor at the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne (England, UK). From 1999 – 2008 he was Professor for Electrical Machines and Drives at Wuppertal University (Germany). Since 2008 he is Professor for Electrical Drive systems and Power Electronics at Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany). His main interests today are: Sensorless control of AC drives, predictive control of power electronics and Hardware-in-the-Loop systems.

    Dr. Kennel is a Senior Member of IEEE, a Fellow of IET (former IEE) and a Chartered Engineer in the UK. Within IEEE he is Treasurer of the Germany Section as well as Distinguished Lecturer of the Power Electronics Society (IEEE-PELS).

    Dr. Kennel has received in 2013 the Harry Owen Distinguished Service Award from IEEE-PELS as well as the EPE Association Distinguished Service Award in 2015.

    Dr. Kennel was appointed “Extraordinary Professor” by the University of Stellenbosch (South Africa) from 2016 to 2019 and as “Visiting Professor” at the Haixi Institute by the Chinese Academy of Sciences from 2016 to 2021. There he was appointed as “Jiaxi Lu Overseas Guest Professor” in 2017.

  • Frede Blaabjerg University of Aalborg, Denmark
    Frede Blaabjerg University of Aalborg, Denmark
    Power Electronics – The Key Technology for Renewable Energy System Integration

    The energy paradigms in many countries (e.g., Germany and Denmark) have experienced a significant change from fossil-based resources to clean renewables (e.g., wind turbines and photovoltaics) in the past few decades. The scenario of highly penetrated renewables is going to be further enhanced– Denmark expects to be 100 percent fossil-free by 2050.

    Consequently, it is required that the production, distribution and use of the energy should be as technologically efficient as possible and incentives to save energy at the end-user should also be strengthened. In order to realize the transition smoothly and effectively, energy conversion systems, currently based on power electronics technology, will again play an essential role in this energy paradigm shift. Using highly efficient power electronics in power generation, power transmission/distribution and end-user application, together with advanced control solutions, can pave the way for renewable energies.

    In light of this, some of the most emerging renewable energies, e.g., wind energy and photovoltaic, which by means of power electronics are changing character as a major part in the electricity generation —, are explored in this paper. Issues like technology development, implementation, power converter technologies, control of the systems, and synchronization are addressed. Special focuses are paid on the future trends in power electronics for those systems like how to lower the cost of energy and to develop emerging power devices and better reliability tool.

    BIOGRAPHY

    Frede Blaabjerg (S’86–M’88–SM’97–F’03) was with ABB-Scandia, Randers, Denmark, from 1987 to 1988. From 1988 to 1992, he got the PhD degree in Electrical Engineering at Aalborg University in 1995. He became an Assistant Professor in 1992, an Associate Professor in 1996, and a Full Professor of power electronics and drives in 1998. From 2017 he became a Villum Investigator.

    His current research interests include power electronics and its applications such as in wind turbines, PV systems, reliability, harmonics and adjustable speed drives. He has published more than 450 journal papers in the fields of power electronics and its applications. He is the co-author of two monographs and editor of 6 books in power electronics and its applications.

    He has received 18 IEEE Prize Paper Awards, the IEEE PELS Distinguished Service Award in 2009, the EPE-PEMC Council Award in 2010, the IEEE William E. Newell Power Electronics Award 2014 and the Villum Kann Rasmussen Research Award 2014. He was the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS from 2006 to 2012. He has been Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Power Electronics Society from 2005 to 2007 and for the IEEE Industry Applications Society from 2010 to 2011 as well as 2017 to 2018.

    He is nominated in 2014, 2015 and 2016 by Thomson Reuters to be between the most 250 cited researchers in Engineering in the world. In 2017 he became Honoris Causa at University Politehnica Timisoara (UPT), Romania.

  • Bulent Sarlioglu University of Wisconsin, USA
    Bulent Sarlioglu University of Wisconsin, USA
    High Speed Machine Design Considerations including the Novel Flux Switching Permanent Magnet Machines

    FSPM machine has sinusoidal flux linkage, back-EMF, and rigid                rotor structure that is suitable for a wide range of applications including high-speed operation. Conventional 12/10 FSPM machine requires an unfeasible value of fundamental frequency at high-speed condition. Hence, there are challenges in iron loss, magnet loss, and inverter switching losses for high-speed applications. Dual-stator 6/4 FSPM machine has the lowest fundamental frequency requirement for three-phase operation. It achieves significantly harmonic distortion reduction in flux linkage and less torque ripple compared to conventional 6/4 FSPM machine. Therefore, dual-stator 6/4 FSPM machine has great potential for high-speed operations.

    BIOGRAPHY

    Bulent Sarlioglu (M’94-SM’13) received his B.S. from Istanbul Technical University, in 1990, M.S. degree from University of Missouri–Columbia in 1992, and Ph.D. from University of Wisconsin–Madison in 1999, all in electrical engineering. Since 2011, he has been an assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and the associate director of the Wisconsin Electric Machines and Power Electronics Consortium (WEMPEC). From 2000 to 2011, he worked at Honeywell International Inc.’s aerospace division (Torrance, California), most recently as a Staff Systems Engineer. He received Honeywell’s Outstanding Engineer Award in 2011. His expertise includes

    electrical machines, drives, and power electronics, and he is the inventor or co-inventor of 16 U.S. patents as well as many international patents. He received the NSF CAREER Award in 2016. The tutorial will cover topics related to the current and novel designs for high-speed machines, which is one of the areas of expertise of our research group led by Dr. Bulent Sarlioglu

  • Dr. Martin Ordonez University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Dr. Martin Ordonez University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Optimization Techniques for Solar Power Plants

    Solar power installations are extremely sensitive to the cost of the installation, the expected payback time, and the availability of energy generation over time. Many factors have to be weighed in the design of a PV system (e.g., panels, arrays, inverters), but traditional design rules are too simplistic and do not make use of critical information. Often, oversized components are used that do not produce any advantages for the PV system. An alternative to the traditional approach is to optimize the different components of the system in order to obtain an overall system that minimizes installation cost, payback time, or other user defined targets. In this tutorial, models, methods, and techniques will be presented to optimize the performance of the PV systems. Three aspects of the design process will be addressed: 1) PV plant size optimization, based on detailed models; 2) PV inverter stage optimization, based on power envelope and mini-boost stages; and 3) maximum power point tracking strategies. The discussion of each of these topics will focus on design considerations and on the trade-offs between different factors that lead to optimal solutions. The topics are discussed in relation to industry standard practices, and this is followed by the introduction of advanced techniques that yield better performance.

    BIOGRAPHY

    Dr. Martin Ordonez is currently the Canada Research Chair in Power Converters for Renewable Energy Systems and Associate Professor with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. He is also the holder of the Fred Kaiser Professorship on Power Conversion and Sustainability at UBC. He was an adjunct Professor with Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada, and MUN. His industrial experience in power conversion includes research and development at Xantrex Technology Inc./Elgar Electronics Corp. (now AMETEK Programmable Power in San Diego, California), Deep-Ing Electronica de Potencia (Rosario, Argentina), and TRV Dispositivos (Cordoba, Argentina). With the support of industrial funds and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, he has contributed to more than 100 publications and R&D reports. Dr. Ordonez is an Associate Editor of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, a Guest Editor for IEEE JOURNAL OF EMERGING AND SELECTED TOPICS IN POWER ELECTRONICS, an Editor for IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SUSTAINABLE ENERGY serves on several IEEE committees, and reviews widely for IEEE/IET journals and international conferences. He was awarded the David Dunsiger Award for Excellence in the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science (2009) and the Chancellors Graduate Award/Birks Graduate Medal (2006), and became a Fellow of the School of Graduate Studies, MUN.

  • Venkata Yaramasu Northern Arizona University, USA.
    Venkata Yaramasu Northern Arizona University, USA.
    Model Predictive Control of Wind Energy Conversion Systems

    SCOPE AND BENEFITS

    Wind energy is rapidly becoming mainstream and competitive with conventional sources of energy. Wind energy installed capacity has increased exponentially over the past three decades and has become a real alternative to boost renewable energy penetration into the energy mix. The wind energy industry has experienced considerable technological advancements in terms of aerodynamic design, mechanical systems, electric generators, power electronic converters, control theory, and power system integration. Electric generators, power electronic converters, and control theory are the three important elements to enable the safe, reliable, and high-performance operation of wind energy conversion systems (WECS) while complying with the stringent grid code requirements.

    In recent years, with the technological advancements in digital signal processors, the model predictive control (MPC) strategy has emerged as a simple and promising digital control tool in power electronics, variable-speed motor drives, and energy conversion systems. The MPC is a nonlinear control method and provides an approach that is better suited for controlling power converters in WECS. This method also mitigates several technical and operational disadvantages associated with classical control techniques, particularly during the low-switching frequency operation needed by the megawatt-level energy conversion systems. The MPC is attractive for controlling fast varying electrical variables because of its simple and intuitive concept, digital controller friendliness, finite number of optimizations, elimination of proportional-integral controllers, pulse-width-modulator-free structure, fast dynamic response, good steady-state performance during all operating conditions, capability to compensate perturbations and dead times of power conversion system, ease in incorporating nonlinearities and limitations in the design, and improved treatment of multivariable control problems with decoupling.

    This tutorial presents a comprehensive material on three important subject matters: power converters, wind energy systems, and MPC. The proposed tutorial deals with the MPC of power converters employed in a wide variety of variable-speed WECS. The content in this tutorial is also useful for other power conversion systems such as adjustable-speed motor drives, photovoltaic energy systems, high voltage direct current transmission, and power quality conditioners.

     

    This tutorial covers a wide range of topics on power converters, wind energy conversion, and MPC from the electrical engineering aspect. The contents of this tutorial includes an overview of wind energy system configurations, power converters for variable-speed WECS, digital control techniques, MPC, modeling of power converters and wind generators for MPC design. Other topics include the mapping of continuous-time models to discrete-time models by various exact, approximate, and quasi-exact discretization methods, modeling and control of wind turbine grid-side two-level and multilevel voltage source converters. This tutorial also focuses on the MPC of several power converter configurations for full variable-speed permanent magnet synchronous generator-based WECS, squirrel-cage induction generator-based WECS, and semi-variable-speed doubly fed induction generator-based WECS. By reflecting the latest technologies in the field, this tutorial will be valuable for academic researchers, practicing engineers, and other professionals.

    BIOGRAPHY

    Venkata Yaramasu received his Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada, in 2014. He is currently working as an Assistant Professor at the Northern Arizona University, USA. Dr. Yaramasu published more than 50 peer-reviewed technical papers including 24 journal papers. He published a book entitled “Model Predictive Control of Wind Energy Conversion Systems” with the Wiley-IEEE Press in 2016. He also authored/coauthored three book chapters on wind energy, which are currently in press. He is currently authoring/coauthoring a book entitled “Power Conversion and Control of Wind Energy Systems, Second Edition” for a possible publication with the Wiley-IEEE Press. He has produced 10 technical reports for the power industry. Dr. Yaramasu is a recipient of over 20 research excellence awards including a Second Prize Paper Award from the IEEE Journal of Emerging and Selected Topics in Power Electronics (JESTPE) in 2015.

     

  • Bin Wu Ryerson University, Canada
    Bin Wu Ryerson University, Canada
    Model Predictive Control of Wind Energy Conversion Systems

    SCOPE AND BENEFITS

    Wind energy is rapidly becoming mainstream and competitive with conventional sources of energy. Wind energy installed capacity has increased exponentially over the past three decades and has become a real alternative to boost renewable energy penetration into the energy mix. The wind energy industry has experienced considerable technological advancements in terms of aerodynamic design, mechanical systems, electric generators, power electronic converters, control theory, and power system integration. Electric generators, power electronic converters, and control theory are the three important elements to enable the safe, reliable, and high-performance operation of wind energy conversion systems (WECS) while complying with the stringent grid code requirements.

    In recent years, with the technological advancements in digital signal processors, the model predictive control (MPC) strategy has emerged as a simple and promising digital control tool in power electronics, variable-speed motor drives, and energy conversion systems. The MPC is a nonlinear control method and provides an approach that is better suited for controlling power converters in WECS. This method also mitigates several technical and operational disadvantages associated with classical control techniques, particularly during the low-switching frequency operation needed by the megawatt-level energy conversion systems. The MPC is attractive for controlling fast varying electrical variables because of its simple and intuitive concept, digital controller friendliness, finite number of optimizations, elimination of proportional-integral controllers, pulse-width-modulator-free structure, fast dynamic response, good steady-state performance during all operating conditions, capability to compensate perturbations and dead times of power conversion system, ease in incorporating nonlinearities and limitations in the design, and improved treatment of multivariable control problems with decoupling.

    This tutorial presents a comprehensive material on three important subject matters: power converters, wind energy systems, and MPC. The proposed tutorial deals with the MPC of power converters employed in a wide variety of variable-speed WECS. The content in this tutorial is also useful for other power conversion systems such as adjustable-speed motor drives, photovoltaic energy systems, high voltage direct current transmission, and power quality conditioners.

    This tutorial covers a wide range of topics on power converters, wind energy conversion, and MPC from the electrical engineering aspect. The contents of this tutorial includes an overview of wind energy system configurations, power converters for variable-speed WECS, digital control techniques, MPC, modeling of power converters and wind generators for MPC design. Other topics include the mapping of continuous-time models to discrete-time models by various exact, approximate, and quasi-exact discretization methods, modeling and control of wind turbine grid-side two-level and multilevel voltage source converters. This tutorial also focuses on the MPC of several power converter configurations for full variable-speed permanent magnet synchronous generator-based WECS, squirrel-cage induction generator-based WECS, and semi-variable-speed doubly fed induction generator-based WECS. By reflecting the latest technologies in the field, this tutorial will be valuable for academic researchers, practicing engineers, and other professionals.

    BIOGRAPHY

    Bin Wu graduated from Donghua University, Shanghai, China in 1978, and received his MASc and PhD degrees in electrical and computer engineering from the University of Toronto, Canada, in 1989 and 1993, respectively. After being with Rockwell Automation Canada as a Senior Engineer from 1992 to 1993, he joined Ryerson University, where he is currently a Professor and NSERC/Rockwell Industrial Research Chair (IRC) in Power Electronics and Electric Drives.

    Dr. Wu has been collaborating closely with Canadian companies, including Rockwell Automation Canada and Honeywell Aerospace Canada, assisting them in achieving technical and commercial success through research and new product development. He has published more than 280 technical papers, authored/co-authored two Wiley-IEEE Press books, and holds over 20 issued/pending patents in the areas of power electronics, medium voltage drives, and renewable energy systems.

    Dr. Wu served as an Associate Chair of Technical Program Committee, IEEE Canadian Conference on Electrical and Computer Engineering (CCECE) in 2004, Chair of Technical Program Committee, the 7th IEEE Canada Electric Power Conference (EPC) in 2007, Chair of Power Symposium Committee, IEEE CCECE in 2008, Co-Chair of Technical Program Committee, IEEE International Electric Machines and Drives Conference (IEMDC) in 2011. He was a Guest Editor of IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics Special Section on High Power Drives in 2007 and on Modulation Techniques for DC to AC Power Converters in 2011. Dr. Wu has served as an Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics since 2005.

Video Spec 2017
COMMITTEE
Organizing Committee
  • General Chair:
    Prof. Marco Rivera
  • Committee:
    Doctor José Riveros
    Doctora Yamisleydi Salgeuiro
  • Honorary Chair:
    Prof. José Rodríguez
Committee:
  • Mrs. Paola Poblete
  • Prof. Javier Muñoz
  • Prof. José Espinoza
  • Prof. Braham Ferreira
  • Prof. Patrick Wheeler
CALL FOR PAPERS Important Dates
  • FULL PAPER SUBMISSION:
    AUGUST 15th, 2017
  • NOTIFICATION OF ACCEPTANCE STARTING:
    SEPTEMBER 01, 2017
  • FINAL PAPER SUBMISSION:
    OCTOBER 15TH, 2017
Early Bird Registration
September 3Oth, 2017
IEEE & PELS Member
Full registration
400 USD
IEEE Member 400 USD
Non IEEE member 500 USD
IEEE Student Member with Members of the PELS Society 200 USD
Non IEEE student Member 275 USD
Life member full registration 200 USD
Registration fee of second paper 400 USD
Additional fee per page
(up to 2 pages maximum)
150 USD / per page
Additional Banquet ticket 100 USD
Additional copy of proceedings 40 USD
Tutorials 75 USD
Registration
October 1th, 2017
IEEE & PELS Member
Full registration
500 USD
IEEE Member 500 USD
Non IEEE member 600 USD
IEEE Student Member with Members of the PELS Society 300 USD
Non IEEE student Member 375 USD
Life member full registration 300 USD
Registration fee of second paper 500 USD
Additional fee per page
(up to 2 pages maximum)
150 USD / per page
Additional Banquet ticket 120 USD
Additional copy of proceedings 50 USD
Tutorials 75 USD
ITEMS INCLUDED IN THE REGISTRATION FEE

Conference registration fee includes a copy of the conference proceedings (USB); admission to all technical sessions, eight tea/coffee breaks, four lunches and a Gala dinner. Student Registration will not be entitled to the Gala Dinner.

Place

Klener 349, Puerto Varas, X Región, Chile